The mental health workers’ audio guide – now available

It’s been a while coming but The mental health workers’ audio guide is now available for purchase from The Care Guy shop for less than the price of a lunchtime sandwich. The first 4 of 6 parts are already available and the final two will be out soon. Scroll down to view the contents of each instalment.

You can The Guide parts 1-6 accompanying tables and references containing the contents list for all 6 parts, various diagrams and charts as well as references here……

Contents

Part one – clinical basics

What’s a mental health worker worth?

Three models of mental health and disorder

The biological (medical) model

The social model

Merging the two (stress and vulnerability)

The importance of physiology

The meaning of psychiatric diagnoses

Anxiety

The psychology of anxiety

Depression

The psychology of depression

Psychosis (introduction)

Hallucinations

Delusions part 1

Delusions part 2

Thought disorders

Part 1

Part 2 – The dementias

The dementias

Types of dementia – Alzheimer’s

Types of dementia – Vascular

Types of dementia – Lewy Body

Types of dementia – Parkinson’s

Types of dementia – Korsakoff’s

Types of dementia – Fronto-temporal

Types of dementia – Mixed

Orientation and memory

Delirium

The CAM scale

Working with the limbic system

 

Part 3 – Personality and recovery

Personality disorder

High Expressed Emotion

Sympathy is not usually helpful

More on the Stress & Vulnerability model of mental health and disorder

The invalidating environment

The Self-fulfilling prophecy

The meaning of recovery in mental health

The three types of recovery

 

Part 4 – In practice

Duty of care: A slug in a bottle

‘Hanged if you do, hanged if you don’t’ – a duty of care myth

There is no ‘us and them’

People are just people

Coping skills develop slowly

Lapse is different from relapse

Don’t expect your service user to perform perfectly.

The word ‘support’ is meaningless in and of itself

“It’s just behavioural” (A workers’ excuse for lazy thinking)

Challenging behaviour means….

Behaviours that harm the individual

Behaviours that harm other people

Do we need help?

Consequence, learned behaviour and the need for boundaries

Maintaining the problem

The whole team approach

Firm Boundaries

No ‘Pedestals’ and Staff Safety

Effective, Consistent Care

‘Corporate’ Identity – “You’re All The Same.”

Expectations

 

Part 5 – risk issues

Self-harm

Self-harm as a response to trauma

Responding to a person who harms themselves

Individual v Organisational risk (Risk-free is impossible. Manageable risk is the way to go)

Don’t flap (more haste – less speed)

The saviour fantasy

You’re probably not an emergency service – don’t try to behave like one

 

Part 6 – Thinking styles

Unhelpful thinking

Ignoring the positive

Exaggerating the negative

Overgeneralisation

Catastrophisation

Arbitrary inference

Determinism

Selective abstraction

Global thinking

Dichotomous thinking

Magical thinking (the Wizard did it)

Personalisation

Socratic dialogue and ‘the razors’.

The sticks we use to beat ourselves

Who put us in charge?

Final words

Models of mental health and disorder

The world of mental health care can be confusing – especially for those new to the topic. Often the different theories and professional approaches seem to contradict each other. It’s almost as though different workers speak different languages,

That’s not quite true but they do often come from different theoretical perspectives. That’s why, for example, a social worker and a psychiatrist will give you two completely different explanations for the same person’s problems. They’ve been taught radically different ‘models’ that they use to understand mental health and disorder, its causes and its treatments.

This little table isn’t intended to cover all the different models in depth. Instead think of it as a very basic list of models that can guide you in understanding why people focus upon different things. There’s more to it, of course but it’s a start for newcomers trying to get to grips with the contradictions they come across in practice.

The Care Guy Models of mental health and disorder

Meet the overzealous Mr Selous

Andrew “the overzealous” Selous MP is Ian Duncan Smith’s Parliamentary Private Secretary (PPS). He also seems to be a bit confused. Arguably confusion is to be expected since he cherry picks his ideas of right and wrong from an ancient book with a moral compass that points straight back to the bronze age.

Yet with such a public assertion of faith you’d think he’d have read at least parts of the Bible before taking public office.

His confusion over dyed in the wool biblical issues like gay rights seems very odd. He voted strongly against equal rights for gay people and yet vaccilated about gay marriage. Could it be that his 20th century conscience has been pricked a little despite the ‘ancient wisdom’ of a small group of desert nomads?
Andrew Selous MP social issues voting record
Unfortunately he has had no such fit of conscience in relation to homelessness. This is odd in itself considering that his entry for the SW Bedfordshire Conservative Home website reports a keen interest in homelessness and participation in sponsored sleepouts for homelessness charities.

He supports local homeless charities by taking part in annual sponsored sleep-outs.”

Perhaps though his interest is more about keeping homeless numbers up than about helping the homeless themselves. Perhaps his annual sleep out is no more than a form of penance intended to assuage the wrath of God in payment for his other homelessness related activities.
Andrew Selous MP voting record
As if his voting record wasn’t enough to demonstrate his abusive, pathological need to increase poverty and homelessness he recently attacked that other bastion of his Christian faith, the Trussell Trust. And yet even here he seems confused. Speaking about his local foodbank he said:

“I have been a supporter of Foodbank for many years. Working in addition to the welfare system, Foodbanks have been proven to help turn people’s lives around which is why I think so highly of them”

Andrew Selous, Local Constituency MP

And then he goes and does this:
Andrew Selous MP
It seems that the Right Hon. Andrew Selous MP is fine with his own receipt of taxpayer funded nourishment but not too keen on charitable organisations that provide sustenance to people who really are in need. Especially when those organisations, such as The Trussell Trust have the audacity (some might say ‘sense of fairness and social justice’) to question why so many UK citizens are so desperately hungry in the first place.

Apparently asking questions about hunger and trying to do something to change the situation is ‘too political’. I’d have thought that for someone with such a publically professed Christian faith he’d have heard about ‘the sermon on the mount’ and ‘the beatitudes’ with its list of ‘blessed’ individuals. But let me remind the good Mr. Selous of another familiar bible quote:

“Whatsoever you do unto the least of my brethren, do you also unto me.”
Matthew 25:45

It’s going to take more than the occasional night out of doors to make up for this catalogue of oppression Mr. Selous. Not least because, as the good book says….

You shall know them by their deeds.

Care to share magazine issue 7

Just a reminder. Care to share magazine issue 7 is out today as a series of blog posts or downloadable PDF.

Get your free copy here.

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Mental Health and Social Care

Don’t forget about my other book – also available from The Care Guy website.

MH and SC simple lessons meme

This easy to follow book has been written with social care support workers in mind. It’s jargon free and packed with reflection points, tips and exercises to guide you through the social care process from basic principles to support planning and relapse profiling. What’s more – it only costs a tenner. You can download a sampler here.

The author, Stuart Sorensen has many years experience of working in mental health and social care. Drawing on past experience of ‘real world’ care services he boils down the complicated theory of mental health care into the fundamental principles of best practice. The result is an easy to follow book that explains what mental disorder is, what recovery really means and what social care staff can do to help

Behaviours that challenge

It’s taken me a while to finish this but my new book ‘Behaviours that challenge’ is now on sale on The Care Guy website. Only a tenner plus P&P.

Go on, you know you want to

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Often the advice given to social care workers about behaviours that challenge makes their problems worse instead of better. This easy to follow workbook is full of no nonsense tips, techniques and ideas for dealing with the behaviours YOU face at work (and at home).

Contents

Introductory questionnaire
What is Challenging Behaviour?
Legal principles
Theories of behaviour and interaction
Different types of Challenging Behaviours
Its only behavioural
Philosophy and challenging behaviour (rights, paternalism and intervention – people are just people)
Assertiveness – as opposed to aggression, passivity and passive-aggression
Assessing behaviour – ABC, the Pleasure Principle, lessons from research
Basic behavioural management – classical and operant conditioning, reinforcement, gradual progression
Boundaries and the escalation or recession of inappropriate behaviours
The importance of the whole team approach
The problem with punishment
Expectations
Questionnaire
Answers to safeguarding quiz

Issue 4 of Care To Share Magazine

wpid-Screenshot_2013-10-20-13-21-07-1.pngIt began as no more than a whim – a vague idea that it might be nice to set up an online magazine where anyone with an opinion could have their say about social care. That was back in October. At the time I had no idea what would happen or even if the magazine would make it to its first issue. I needn’t have worried.

Today I published the 4th issue of Care To Share Magazine and material is already coming in for issue 5. It seems that there really is an appetite for this sort of publication, free as it is from commercial constraints and hidden corporate agendas.

In issue 4 you’ll find articles on burnout and the hardships of coping with a family member’s suicide. There’s an appeal to regain some community spirit and another bemoaning the lack of simplicity in social care practice. There’s even a philosophical piece about penguins and the lessons we humans might learn from them. The final piece describing the hopelessness experienced by many returning servicemen and women is both informative and heart-rending.

The contents list is below:

Editors notes by Stuart Sorensen
Sponge by Kirstyn Knowles
The Saviour fantasy and emergency responses by Stuart Sorensen
Let’s keep things simple by Hugh Boyden
Community spirit by Henry Hobson
She took her own life by Claire Hirst (CLASP charity)
Penguins don’t obsess by Michelle Longo
The Mentally Ill need to be Mentally Stronger to get Help by Josephine Bloggs
We merry few, we band of buggered by Carl Spaul
Authors’ guidelines by Stuart Sorensen

You can read this and previous editions of Care To Share Magazine by clicking here

You can also like us on facebook here
or follow the twitter hashtag here.

You might even want to have a go at writing an article or two yourself. Just check the authors’ guidelines first.

Either way – why not click across to the Care To Share Magazine blog to see what all the fuss is about.

Enjoy,

Stuart

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